Bayer CropScience plans to open new R&D site

Published online: Aug 05, 2013

Bayer CropScience plans to consolidate and expand its U.S.-based R&D operations for vegetable seeds and biological crop protection products in a new site in West Sacramento, Calif.

The integrated site, with an existing office and laboratory building on ten acres of land, has the capacity to employ approximately 300 people. The vegetable seeds research, as well as the company's Biologics business management, both located in Davis, California, will move about ten miles to West Sacramento in Q1/2014. The site will also include a pilot plant, and additionally Bayer CropScience has identified nearby land for greenhouse and test plot purposes in West Sacramento.

"We are focused on better leveraging our full research and development capabilities by both consolidating and expanding our global R&D organization," said Dr. David Nicholson, Bayer CropScience's Head of Research & Development. "Our new facilities in West Sacramento will enable us to deliver integrated crop solutions more rapidly by intensifying the research links between our vegetable seeds and Biologics experts and thus strengthening our innovative power."

Johan Peleman, Head of Vegetable Seeds R&D, added: "The new location offers top-notch equipment and allows for a stimulating exchange across disciplines. At the same time, we can further strengthen our bonds with the University of California at Davis, one of the world's top plant science institutes."

Bayer CropScience will use the new site to expand and accelerate the development of innovative products which will be marketed worldwide as part of integrated crop solutions through its global network of field sales and technical resources. "Integrated crop solutions, with biologics and vegetable seeds as key components, will give growers worldwide new tools to manage the diverse demands of the food chain while maximizing the yield and quality of their crops" added Mike Miille, Head of Business Management Biologics at Bayer CropScience.

Source: agprofessional.com